Universal Periodic Review

Every four to five years, Member States of the United Nations assess each other's progress on human rights through the Human Rights Council. The Council then makes a series of recommendations to the government of the country being assessed. This is called the Universal Periodic Review (UPR).

The UPR is a way of holding countries to account for their compliance with international human rights laws and standards. Established in 2008, every one of the 193 UN Member States is reviewed once every four to five years.

The UPR means that Scotland and the UK's performance on human rights is examined against the requirements of international human rights treaties and commitments. The UK was one of the first States to be reviewed in 2008. It was reviewed again in 2012, and is set to be reviewed for a third time in early 2017. The UN will set out its final findings and recommendations later in 2017

As Scotland's national human rights institution the Scottish Human Rights Commission has a distinct role in the review process. We contribute evidence, support civil society organisations to take part in the process, and have speaking rights at the Human Rights Council that a number of international human rights standards and recommendations have not yet been met.

You can view the latest evidence that we have submitted for the 2017 review in full or as an Executive Summary.

You can also read the previous recommendations ("Concluding Observations") resulting from the UK's previous UPR in 2012.

 

The UPR means that Scotland and the UK’s performance on human rights will be examined against the requirements of international human rights treaties and commitments.

As an accredited National Human Rights Institution, the Commission will contribute evidence to this examination, alongside evidence from civil society organisations and reports from government.

The UN will set out its final findings and recommendations in March 2017.